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  • Roger S. Conrad

Elliott Gue knows energy. Since earning his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of London, Elliott has dedicated himself to learning the ins and outs of this dynamic sector, scouring trade magazines, attending industry conferences, touring facilities and meeting with management teams.

Elliott Gue’s knowledge of the energy sector and prescient investment calls prompted the official program of the 2008 G-8 Summit in Tokyo to call him “the world’s leading energy strategist.”

He has also appeared on CNBC and Bloomberg TV and has been quoted in a number of major publications, including Barron’s, Forbes and the Washington Post. Elliott Gue’s expertise and track record of success have also made him a sought-after speaker at MoneyShows and events hosted by the Association of Individual Investors.

Elliott Gue also contributed chapters on developments in global energy markets to two books published by the FT Press, The Silk Road to Riches: How You Can Profit by Investing in Asia’s Newfound Prosperity and Rise of the State: Profitable Investing and Geopolitics in the 21st Century.

Prior to founding the Capitalist Times, Elliott Gue shared his expertise and stock-picking abilities with individual investors in two highly regarded research publications, MLP Profits and The Energy Strategist, as well as long-running financial advisory Personal Finance.

In October 2012, Elliott Gue launched the Energy & Income Advisor, a semimonthly online newsletter that’s dedicated to uncovering the most profitable opportunities in the energy sector, from growth stocks to high-yielding utilities, royalty trusts and master limited partnerships.

The masthead may have changed, but subscribers can expect Elliott Gue to deliver the same high-quality analysis and rational assessment of investment opportunities in the energy patch.

Articles

Oil: Reviewing 2019 and Previewing 2020

One of the best things about commodity markets – and any sort of “real” asset – is that ultimately prices are based on supply and demand.

If the price of oil is “too high,” there’s a market response – rising production and falling demand – that pushes prices back into line over time.

Of course, oil prices can rise or fall in the short-run due to speculative flows in futures markets; in fact, that’s something we watch closely in Energy & Income Advisor over time.

However, ultimately, the price of oil doesn’t rise because people are excited about buying oil — crude rallies when demand for the commodity rises faster than supply.

It really is that simple.

Inflection points in the supply demand equation for oil are rare. In the period from 1998 through 2002, for example, rising demand for crude from emerging markets including China and India shifted the oil market from a period of glut to an era of scarcity. Ultimately that sent crude from lows in the teens in the late 90’s to highs around $150/bbl in 2008.

We believe we’ll look back on 2019 as the year we reached another major inflection point for oil. Specifically, the Saudi -led pump-at-will strategy initiated five years ago has finally had the desired effect – the recent era of persistent glut and shale oversupply is giving way to a new period of tightening supply and demand conditions.

As we approach the end of 2019, it’s time for a detailed assessment and audit of our outlook for energy prices, stocks and our portfolio recommendations.

Oil: Our 2020 Outlook

One of the best things about commodity markets – and any sort of “real” asset – is that ultimately prices are based on supply and demand.

If the price of oil is “too high,” there’s a market response – rising production and falling demand – that pushes prices back into line over time.

Of course, oil prices can rise or fall in the short-run due to speculative flows in futures markets; in fact, that’s something we watch closely in Energy & Income Advisor over time.

Q3 Earnings Roundup – Key Lessons and Where We Go From Here

In the midstream business, companies’ results are being affected very differently by the cutback in drilling rig deployment. Investors are treating sector companies almost as though the blow will fall equally hard on all of them. And MLPs especially can’t catch a break, almost no matter what they report. But the truth is there were very wide differences in the trends behind numbers reported by midstream companies in Q3. And that gap is likely to widen going forward.

Oilfield Services, Oil and Value

Just under half the energy stocks in the S&P 500 have reported Q3 2019 results so far including Schlumberger and Halliburton, the world’s two diversified services majors.

What’s emerged is a clear divergence in performance – growth in international markets and continued pressure on profit margins and growth in North American shale. The international spending upturn is now well underway, which is particularly encouraging when you consider the historic drop in international oilfield spending between 2014 and 2018.

And despite the shale services bust in Q3, we’re seeing some reasons for optimism in North America including industry capacity rationalizations and a change in the way producers contract for services.

In this issue, we’ll take a deeper dive into the services business and some of the comments from both Schlumberger and Halliburton on their Q3 2019 conference calls. We’ll also examine one of the most powerful but overlooked potential upside catalysts for energy stocks in the year ahead.

Diving Deep into Oilfield Services – Getting Stronger Overseas

One of the most important lessons to learn about earnings season is that the market’s reaction to the news can be more important than the news itself.

In other words, if a company reports weak earnings and issues cautious guidance for the quarter ahead; yet, the stock rallies, that’s a sign that market expectations were already low, and the bad news was priced into the stock before it released earnings results.

Subscribe today to receive a sample issue of EIA
  • Live Chat with

    Elliott and Roger on Aug. 31, 2020

  • Portfolios & Ratings

    • Model Portfolios

      Balanced portfolios of energy stocks for aggressive and conservative investors.

    • Producers and Drillers

      Our take on more than 50 energy-related equities, from upstream to downstream and everything in between.

    • MLPs and Midstream

      Our assessment of every energy-related master limited partnership.

    • International Coverage

      Roger Conrad’s coverage of more than 70 dividend-paying energy names.

    Experts

    • Elliott H. Gue

      Founder and Chief Analyst: Capitalist Times and Energy & Income Advisor

    • Roger S. Conrad

      Founder and Chief Analyst: Capitalist Times and Energy & Income Advisor